Specialized patrols

From patrolling in squad cars to engaging the community on bike, horse and foot, the WSUPD is dedicated to protecting and empowering Warriors in whatever way possible.

  • Motorized patrol

    WSUPD officers patrol campus in traditional ways, such as by patrol car and motorcycle. This allows officers to surveil not only campus but also the surrounding Midtown community, which has resulted in one of the safest neighborhoods in Michigan. Motorized patrol allows the WSUPD to rapidly respond, with times as low as 90 seconds in an emergency.

  • Campus community patrol

    The Campus Community Police Officer program fosters relationships between members of the Wayne State community and the officers of the WSUPD by promoting involvement, cooperation and communication. Officers engage with Warriors at campuswide events and encourage community members to ask questions and build friendly relationships.

    This is key to community oriented policing, as these relationships provide the opportunity for all members of the Wayne State community to clarify misunderstanding, correct misconceptions, eliminate stereotyping and deflect rumors. A positive relationship between the police and community leads to better communication, enhanced trust, and a safer place to learn, live, work and play.  

  • Bike patrol

    The WSUPD Bicycle Patrol Unit provides a low-cost, environmentally safe alternative to motorized patrol. The unit was founded during the winter of 1992. A committee met over a period of three months to develop equipment, uniforms, training and operating procedures. The unit first appeared in May 1992 at the City of Detroit Special Olympics competition held at Wayne State University's Warrior Stadium.

    Bicycle patrol officers are currently assigned to different shifts and to the Community Oriented Policing (COP) section. Shift bicycle officers operate from early April to late October and patrol campus all the hours of the day. COP officers afford the same degree of visibility during special university and city events.

    Since its development, several metro Detroit law enforcement agencies have requested assistance in developing their own bicycle patrol units. The WSUPD Bicycle Patrol Unit has served as a model for the cities of Detroit, Roseville, Grosse Pointe Park and Farmington, and as security for Henry Ford Hospital and the Fox Theatre district.

  • K-9 patrol

    The K-9 Unit includes three full-time handlers. Officer Andrew Grimm and his partner Lucky have patrolled campus together since the summer of 2018. Lucky is trained in explosives detection and tracking. Together, they help locate fleeing criminal offenders throughout the city, assist with the recovery of discarded firearms and provide assistance at major off-campus events.

    Officer Greg Roberts patrols with Wolverine, a Vapor Wake dog trained to safely detect body-worn explosives in large crowds, and Bruno, a German Shepherd specializing in narcotics detection, tracking and criminal apprehension.

    Officer Tom Box and his Belgian Malinois partner Havoc have patrolled campus together since June 2017. Havoc is trained in explosives detection and tracking. They regularly assist with explosives detection efforts at Ford Field in advance of home games and major events.

    Each canine officer and his partner undergo extensive training before hitting the road. They also train regularly with members of the Detroit Police Department and Federal Reserve Police K-9 units. Each officer has a patrol car specially outfitted to accommodate his partner. 

  • Mounted patrol

    In 2017, the Wayne State University Police Department added a mounted unit to its patrols. Officers patrol campus atop a horse, providing a unique way to interact with the community. Mounted officers also assist with special events throughout the city of Detroit, including parades and sporting events. They provide a source of excitement and curiosity to visitors of campus and Midtown.